Tag Archives: Peter Capaldi

Doctoring on

Well, what to say? Most people have already said it all, and it’s interesting to see how many anti-female-Doctor fans are out there. (What about the Master? And him fancying Missy? That’s weird enough.)

I really don’t care, as long as the new Doctor can act, and they get a decent script to work with. I don’t know Jodie Whittaker at all. I like her surname. She looks nice in general. I’ll await the future and see what I think.

Perhaps it was the sex-change aspect Peter Capaldi was referring to when he hinted that the next re-generation will be more difficult? We’ll see.

Another thing that surprised me this week was an informal poll on social media as to people’s favourite assistant. Bill came last or second last with most who took part. And as I said before, I think she’s the best we’ve had. I don’t get it. The last few episodes of this season of Doctor Who proved her greatness, as far as I’m concerned.

Dr Who

And that of Peter Capaldi. He has done extremely well this season. I don’t want him to go, but I reckon that’s why he should. Let him leave on a high.

Spent a couple of days last week watching the last two thirds of season ten with Daughter who had lagged behind for various reasons. It was good to see most of them again in quick succession, and watching again meant I noticed details I’d missed.

I’ll miss Bill, and I’ll miss no.12. But the others have become good friends, so I see no reason why no. 13 can’t win me over as well.

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Who knows?

Doctor Who

He’s looking like a Rolling Stone in those sunglasses. In general I feel Doctor Who is looking cooler than before, or is that just me? He feels more with it, as well. So I’m already mourning the Peter Capaldi Doctor, long before he goes.

Bill is one of the most perfect assistants I’ve seen. Have they been listening to us, or was it merely a stroke of luck? But then, it’s one thing to match a new assistant to an existing Doctor. And another to make her work well with the next Doctor.

Not sure about Nardole, although he is starting to make more sense. First he was a bit fun, and then that fun got irritating. Now, though, I am guessing there is a point to him. Not even Missy was too annoying in the latest episode, and that’s saying a lot.

So far I’ve liked all the episodes. They’ve been the right amount of exciting and not too scary, because, as someone pointed out again recently, this is a programme for children. The fact that old people enjoy the Doctor is a bonus.

Keep this up!

Who was best, the Doctor or Christie?

Doctoring your Agatha Christie… I wish they hadn’t. I didn’t initially remember* the original Witness for the Prosecution, but I gather the BBC added the odd thing at the end, and even when you don’t know the plot intimately, it was pretty obvious that someone had been allowed to go crazy. And I don’t mean the murderer or his unfortunate solicitor. Or even the sad victim who wasn’t the murderer after all.

The first half of this Agatha Christie short story was good and even a little enjoyable, bar the coughing from Toby Jones. Even the beginning of the second half was all right and the plot went in the expected direction. The falsely accused murderer and his ‘wife’ were both excellent. But I did hate the coughing. On the other hand, it was illuminating seeing the importance of good health care and how you can be virtually brought back from the almost dead. Unless you have been murdered.

The Return of Doctor Mysterio

Doctor Who, on the other hand, was a delight from beginning to end. I know people who hated it, but you need to keep in mind that Doctor Who is a programme for children, not adults. Doesn’t stop quite a few of us from liking it, though.

Superheroes, what’s not to like? The baby was a bit weird, but it was the babysitter we had an interest in. And his (her?) mother. Matt Lucas was fine, but I really didn’t grasp his role in all of this. Maybe his task was to look a bit odd and make a few funny comments?

But you know, the Doctor was expected, as he hung upside down outside the boy’s bedroom window. We all expect a visit from an unknown older male at Christmas, don’t we?

I had just about forgotten that we’d not had the Doctor round for the past year. But I’m ready for him now.


*It all came back to me after a while. The 1957 film was much better. And I also now recall trying to get my hands on the book, in Swedish translation, for a friend. It was impossible. I was at the back of a very long queue.

Paddington

Paddington

It’s a fun concept to have the Earl from Downton fighting Mrs Coulter over a bear, with some assistance from the Doctor. Paddington was lovely. I’d heard he would be, but you still want to make sure.

Going to see Paddington was our New Year’s Eve treat, and it was (shock, horror) our first cinema outing after moving. We will be back soon again, and as the car parking has been paid until tomorrow lunch time, perhaps we should hurry.

I don’t know the book about Paddington as well as I ought to, but on the plus side that meant I didn’t have to sit there wondering why they left things out or why they put new things in. It was all rather sweet, and I now feel I have a deeper understanding of the background to the marmalade.

The bear jokes were funny and obvious, and so much better for it. ‘Bear left!’

There is something deliciously scary having Nicole Kidman looking like a sweet, young thing, and being so truly bad. And Hugh Bonneville didn’t really have to alter his Downton personality. The Earl would also disapprove of a bear moving in, until he saw the light and changed his mind and started loving the bear.

Mrs Brown was perfectly cast, and I’d love for Sally Hawkins to be my mummy, too. London looked great (if fairly romantically portrayed), and little Paddington was a charming young man. Bear, sorry.

Peter Capaldi was fantastic, and I’m only pointing that out because I’ve not seen him in much. And when I move to London, I’ll go and live in that street, too. Please?

Paddington

Downton Who?

Another November, another end to another season of Doctor Who. And to Downton Abbey. When they started in August and September it felt like we did nothing but watch television all weekend. It was great to get all of the Doctor in one fell swoop, though, instead of half a season here and half a season there.

As for Downton Abbey I was under the – obviously erroneous – impression it was doing its last rounds. Not only is there one for Christmas, but more is coming next autumn. Oh well. It is a soap, after all. They never stop.

Although it feels as if they are getting ready to chop quite a few of their characters, while having carefully enlisted some replacements. Have the actors had enough? Probably. I’d be sad to see Tom go, but he’s able to. Maybe Edith could too. But Mary will be held hostage forever.

I worry for the dowager, but hopefully Maggie Smith has many more years of acting in her still. And you could just see that poor Anna was in for it, almost from the word go. They concentrated too much on that train ticket.

The Doctor. Well. Peter Capaldi was OK. Ish. It’s tricky going from a jolly young man to a troubled and downright weird older one, but it can be done, and it was. I believe it’s Clara we mostly have a problem with. While I’m not 100% sold on the actress, I don’t mind the role so much.

I suppose we feel that anyone ought to be grateful to be the Doctor’s assistant and not moan so much or doubt that they are doing the right thing, but why not? She does need to think of her life and where it is going. And for a while there with the Cybermen I felt she was almost convincing as the Doctor. Maybe it’s really been her all the time?

There’s enough to look forward to. And a couple of the episodes of Doctor Who were among the best I’ve seen.

In Downton I quite enjoyed the divorce and Jewishness issues. The cousin will be interesting to watch (I take it she is here to stay). And so will her counterpart, the angry father-in-law.

Meanwhile I’ll make the most of not having a series to watch evey single day.

Saturday night

I have held back on saying anything about the new Doctor Who. Not the man himself; I reckon Peter Capaldi will do as well as most of the others. And Clara remains Clara, whatever we think of her. But I’ve not been 100% sold on the first couple of episodes. OK if you want to watch something, but not stirring stuff.

Not that Doctor Who has to be all that special. It’s only a television programme, after all. But occasionally they start off with a gem, getting viewers excited, before it fizzles out. This time it took three tries before they got anywhere at all, but looking at social media I see most people found last night not terribly good.

Oh, well. We can’t all be the same.

Which brings me to the serendipitous moment we finished with the Doctor and ended up with Last Night of the Proms, Glasgow version. We joined just as Katherine Jenkins sang about a union, before going on to sing it was time to say goodbye. Both excellent songs. Neither of them on the programme by mistake, I imagine.

Ever the turncoat, I stayed on for the second half from Albert Hall, although reading a book at the same time, so as not to pay too much attention to south of the border. I do actually like those ‘contentious’ pieces of music, traditionally played at the end. Not because of what they supposedly stand for. They just sound good.

You can hijack anything for any purpose. I first heard Land of Hope and Glory on a television programme about the Empire, many years ago. I loved it. I had no idea what it stood for, and thought it was something they had arranged for the programme. I think that’s the thing about coming fresh to stuff. You have none of the emotional baggage people who were born to it do.

So I like Elgar, and not for any empire or union or political party or anything else. Nor do I believe Holst would have wanted to support the Yes campaign, but I see no reason not to use his music. It’s a wonderful piece, and the ‘coincidence’ was quite amusing.

As was Sakari Oramo as conductor. I thought this supposedly silent Finn would never stop talking! But his outfit was nice. And so was his smile at the end, as he watched his audience sing Auld Lang Syne.

Besides, Doctor Who is Scottish. And he’s not the first one, either.

The Musketeers

I was a bit shocked, to be honest. Had I not read a preview of The Musketeers, I’d have been far more confused as well. For someone with a poor memory, I do remember what the beginning of The Three Musketeers is like, even after all these years.

And this was not it. But then, it did say ‘based on the characters of’ and it was that. Very 21st century musketeering.

I know we are meant to enjoy looking at all those delicious young men, but I am so old that I had only that ghastly Richelieu to look at. The musketeers did nothing for me. OK, their boss, Captain Treville, looked reasonable, I suppose. And was the King meant to be so young?

I did enjoy the landlady, now that I think about it.

Might try it one more week before I give up.