Tag Archives: Miguel Ferrer

NCIS: Los Angeles back-to-back

What kind of rubbish is this?

I left NCIS: LA a few weeks before Christmas, because I was busy and because they ceased to excite me even slightly. So the episodes started piling up, waiting to be watched, but I was in no hurry, and it was only a lull in life in general that got us going, watching three episodes this last week, ending with the Christmas one.

Even this close to February, I can be a sucker for a Christmas episode; a little too sweet and a bit soft. But this was ridiculous, and not eased by the team drinking to Hetty and Granger.

While not averse to some team romance, there is too much of it, and it is too silly. Our previously normal people act like idiots over extremely minor aspects to life and love. OK, I know not everyone can be Gibbs of over ten years ago, but the restrained way he and Hollis Mann conducted their affair is to be admired, and copied.

And the crimes! There isn’t much to them, and they might not be ‘easy’ to solve, but some of the clues are obvious, but the agents still labour over them forever.

As for their succession of bosses, they ought to be embarrassed. Retire Hetty in an official way. There is no reason not to. Mosley, well, I don’t know. But she’s not there, is she? Ochoa? Nice looking. Too nice. Rogers could be good, but they are not letting him. He could be a new Granger if he hadn’t been made to look like a fool.

Is there a reason to continue watching?

And for anyone who thinks I like nothing, I do. The green booths in Deeks’ and Kensi’s new bar look fantastic!

Cliffhangers-R-Us

Well.

Is it me, or is it them? Am I older, wiser and more cynical [only], or are they not writing such good end of season episodes any longer?

NCIS went out of their way to make Mark Harmon – or do I mean Gibbs? – seem nicer. A sort of ‘I’ll share my worst moment if you’ll share yours.’ Things are so bad that I almost like Kasie in Abby’s lab. That’s without a period of grace having passed.

It made more sense having Sloane go crazy on screen than reading about it beforehand. But I’m still not sure about everyone seemingly having a big, awful past.

Anyway, the end of season 15 of NCIS made such an impression on me that two days later I had to ask Daughter how it had ended. I just didn’t remember without a prompt. And I will not spend all summer worrying about the Director.

Which brings me to who I will spend all summer not worrying about in NCIS: Los Angeles. Hidoko, I will worry about. I don’t feel it was conclusive what happened, except it probably did. Odd that nothing was shown, though.

But all the rest? Nah, not worrying. There was too much; personal quarrels, lots of bangs and far too much fire. And Mosley… She’s gone from quite OK and providing some fresh input, to being stir crazy, rather like Sloane. It’s great to have another woman boss, and a black one at that. But did they have to portray her like this? She could have worried about her son while still being lucid and professional. Is it men writing women?

But this being mean and unprofessional, while demanding sympathy and dressing to the nines? Was sending Hetty to Vietnam a test to see if Mosley could take over? Granger could have. Now Hetty is back, and she’s the only one who acts normal.

Sam walked just fine whenever he lost the stick. Unless finding yourself in a vehicle on fire will put an end to any walking, good or otherwise.

We’ll see when September comes.

So long, Granger

I’d like to think that Miguel Ferrer, who died yesterday, told NCIS: Los Angeles scriptwriters to stick a knife in him. If you know you’re ill and if you are still working, it’s such an obvious thing to do, killing your character in style.

I’m obviously speculating here, which is something I don’t approve of. We’re in a cliffhanger, waiting to see what will happen in LA, but Deputy Director Granger has clearly been unwell, and now he’s not just been arrested but stabbed. As Daughter pointed out, they already have him unconscious in a hospital bed.

Granger

Owen Granger was that kind of character I’ve come to realise I like. By that I mean they turn up and act bad and you hate them and want them gone, and then ever so slowly, they inch their way into the show they’re on and gain respect, and love. (Vance was another one we mistrusted deeply.)

And I wonder if he was brought in, in case Hetty was looking for retirement? In which case we have a Dallas situation, like when they retired the Ewings’ mother and then her replacement died and she herself came back, not as old or tired as had been made out.

Thinking about it now, I feel as if Granger has been – mostly – elsewhere for some time. They are talking about him, but he’s not actually there with the rest of the team. Like Daniela Ruah’s pregnancy, maybe this was planned long ago.

So, it remains to be seen what they do about Granger. I’m assuming they will kill him in the next episode. In which case he died with his boots on.

Miguel Ferrer can’t be replaced.

(Photo © CBS)

NCIS: Los Angeles – Hot Water

Well.

Who’d have thought?

I know I’ve been saying NCIS: Los Angeles has had the better writing for quite some time now, but Hot Water was really something. (Even the Resident IT Consultant noticed it was good.) It was a bit like Philip Pullman’s Tiger in the Well, where one by one the team is taken out and you’re not left with much.

Well, you’ve got the ladies, who unlike me are probably stronger than a washed out Twinings Earl Grey. And Beale. And they had their escape route down the hatch. Unless that was a red herring. But I don’t think it was.

OK, so all the alphabet agencies are either very evil [all of them] or they are surprisingly stupid to have been taken in by the mole. I mean, someone must be able to think! Yes?

I take great care not to leave my dead bodies where just anyone can find them, especially if trying to appear normal. So why would NCIS?

In a way not much happened. Yet. And now we have a two week wait before we are continued. It had better be worth it.

Mole in Los Angeles

Still hunting for the elusive mole, NCIS: Los Angeles is managing better than its big brother in keeping us entertained. Keeping the team together is one important factor in this. So, Daniela Ruah might have been pregnant with her second baby (right up until Labor day, of all days), but they have worked round this. No sudden introduction of two or three new faces to make up for the loss of a much loved one.

Daniela Ruah and family, on instagram

Sam, Deeks, Kensi and Callen

We could tell she was pregnant towards the end of season seven, and now they have hit on the clever solution of having Kensi badly injured and putting her in a hospital bed. How long for is another matter, but she is there. And out on jobs she has been replaced by Nell, without the need for a new actor.

The question is who will turn out to be the mole. I suspect that when they first thought of having one, they never decided who it would be. Maybe they still haven’t. (The first actor to want to quit, perhaps?)

Hetty is ripe for retirement. Will she go? Granger has improved and risen in everyone’s estimation, and he could replace Hetty, were it not for the interaction the two of them have.

To be honest, however, I am less bothered by the LA team, because I never loved them as much as I did their Washington colleagues.

NCIS: Los Angeles – The Seventh Child

Would it have been quite so disturbing and with that edge-of-your-seat feeling if this week’s NCIS: Los Angeles hadn’t screened at much the same time as the Brussels suicide bombings? On top of that Bookwitch had a book review featuring identical twins with no prior knowledge of each other, and with more disturbing plot developments.

It was as if I’d got suicide bombers and multiple births on my brain. I found it very hard, actually I found it impossible, to relax while watching The Seventh Child. I’m not even sure if it was especially good as episodes go. Kensi and Deeks engaged in silly chat about babies, and Callen was back talking about his rotten childhood.

Yes, I know both of these fit in with the plot, but just sometimes it’d be good not to have everything the team does mirrored in the cases. It’s always different when there are child characters involved, and this was probably far worse than most. It wasn’t all sweetness and cute, or particularly safe.

NCIS: Los Angeles – Chernoff, K

Am I alone in being underwhelmed by Callen’s disproportionately childish search for his unknown father? It is not that big a deal. The man is an adult, and finding this long lost father will not take away any hurt he suffered as a child. And why are the people around him keeping back the information? If they know something, or can find out (and why can’t Callen?), why not tell him?

I’m grateful that we didn’t leave season six on a massive cliffhanger. It is quite possible to have a good summer and return to a new season without them. Although if Callen could have seen what we did at the end, he’d really have something to brood about.

Hope they will deal with this sensibly and swiftly when we meet again.

Tried to understand what the big deal was with the missing oil. No, we don’t want known terrorists to have access to money or weapons of any sort, but they will and they do.

Those forests were decidedly un-Russian, but was obviously the best California had to offer. Good to see they asked a friend to shoot some real Moscow street scenes for them. And Arkady is always a delight. Glad that he’s not enough of a baddie to die when shot.

The last few episodes of the season were a bit weaker than the beginning and middle, but there is hope.