Tag Archives: Michael Weatherly

Leave of Gabse-sense?

We made you big. Now it’s your turn to honour that, by providing us with NCIS episodes worthy of your fans’ devotion. Instead you are ‘thanking’ us by invariably serving up complete rubbish, with the odd silver nugget every now and then. I put those good moments down to unexpected good writing coupled with appropriate directing.

It just doesn’t happen often enough for a number one show.

Because it could do. It used to. If anyone on NCIS or CBS had time and inclination to revisit the past, you’d see how it ought to be done. You’d see what made you number one.

You made the show. Us, the fans, made you number one. We deserve better. Hell, even you deserve better.

Instead of this gradual weakening, which means you’ll go out with a whimper at some point in the future, you could make us one last terrific season of NCIS and go out with a bang. Something to remember you by. Something that would make some of us sad, and make us miss you.

Get it right!

As I understand it, the actors get paid well enough, although I suspect the male actors might be paid more. Mark Harmon is certainly rumoured to make a minor fortune for every episode. I almost wrote ‘earn’ but realised that he doesn’t earn anything the way he’s forgotten to act, or even caring about the show or the fans.

This week’s dance around Fornell? Embarrassing.

McGee has let himself go completely. It’s not the twins; it’s something much deeper that’s wrong. The beard, obviously, but there’s more to it. Or less, depending on how you see it.

Bishop is mostly the way she was, but comes across as quite mature by comparison. Torres is a treasure. He’s cool in way DiNozzo never was (although I recognise that Michael Weatherly was what kept people together), and kind at the same time.

Palmer is good, managing to be a cross between his old self and Ducky. I’m a bit disappointed now with Sloan, who seems to forget how an agent behaves and babbles about things all over the place, getting emotional. But that will be the script writers, not the actor.

Finally Abby. She’s not quite herself, but based on the rift between Pauley Perrette and Mark Harmon, that’s hardly surprising. I can’t work out how Abby’s going to go, but that almost doesn’t matter now. If the show is to continue (please no!) there needs to be a forensic scientist, but how they could make that work, I’ve no idea.

Back to the money. NCIS must make a fair bit of money, being number one and all that, and managing to pay its actors handsomely. I can’t help but feel that this means they have responsibilities too, to the viewers, and to their advertisers. It’s time you all worked for that money. It’s clearly too late for mature behaviour on the set, but I feel the money should pay for that as well.

So, you can’t – or won’t – have Abby and Gibbs on at the same time. If one or both of them is dangerous and a risk to others, the police should be told. If there is ‘merely’ a quarrel of some kind, a major CBS show like NCIS should be strong enough to make two actors work together like the adults they supposedly are.

Fixing it so they are never together is ruining not just season 15, but it really does take pleasure away from past seasons. Somehow you can’t un-see what is going on now. Watching season 14 backwards, you discover that the rift was already there. The last two episodes are almost totally free from overlap between the two, and the episodes before them have a really weird feel to them.

It’s too late to put all this right. I wish you could, because we really do deserve better. The odd, almost OK episode would almost make up for it, were it not for the Gabby split.

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A misspent middle age

We got to chatting about actors who have appeared twice on NCIS, Daughter and I. Purely to relax, obviously. Also obviously, actors appearing twice as different characters. She mentioned one, while I could only remember another.

He was up a ladder outside a hotel room in one episode. Very briefly. ‘I think it was in Once A Hero,’ I said. I’ll have a look. ‘That’s season four,’ Daughter pointed out. ‘I know, it’s episode eight, if I’m not mistaken.’ (She was a bit put out by that…)

And once I found him – it was Francesco Quinn – I located the other episode, which was One Shot, One Kill, where he had a slightly longer part, although he died pretty quickly there too. Reading on about Francesco I discovered that, sadly, he died in 2011. Also that he was the son of Anthony Quinn, which was obvious when I knew, but I’d never thought to look him up on IMDb before.

The actor Daughter had had in mind was Clyde Kusatsu, and when we moved on to him I remembered both his roles, but felt he wasn’t quite as obviously the same actor. Benjamin Franklin, made fun of by DiNozzo, was rather different from Ducky’s gardener and very good friend of Mrs Mallard’s, in The Tie That Binds.

In fact, the reason Francesco Quinn was so much more memorable, is that the episodes were older. That was back when we watched them ‘quite a lot.’ Whereas the gardener appeared in last year’s NCIS, which I might have watched once, maybe twice. And I absolutely couldn’t have named the season or the episode.

These days I don’t even have time to misspend my time.

The second coming of Bull

That was a really wise start to the second season of Bull. We’d grown a little complacent, hadn’t we?

Instead of more smooth Bull moves, we are met with a discordant workplace, no money, and a Bull who seemingly teams up with the wrong side of a potential court case. And Chunk wants to leave.

Well, we can’t have any of that, and luckily Bull can still use his psychology to see who’s lying and who isn’t. Except when it comes to his lady friends, but that’s true of many men.

And then it turns out his clients don’t need to be told about his wonderful mirroring jury system, either. But this is Bull, and all will be well.

Danny, Marissa and Cable

Still good for relaxing

Old NCIS is like family. I’ve noticed how clichéd the term family has become, because it matters more than anything else. It might be that the team comes before, well, I hope not before family, but then most of our NCIS team are not family people. I am, but I can let NCIS in as well. Unlike that crap film I started to watch the other evening, a few old episodes really do relax and entertain me.

I have moved between the seasons for a while, and didn’t quite know where to go next, so I actually started on fourteen again. The first episode is better when you know the rest of the year; you know what became of the new people and who they were. Torres was darker to begin with. I feel maybe they should have him stop clowning about so much, unless he’s to be the next DiNozzo.

Oddly enough, the more I see of Kate, the less I like her. DiNozzo improved with her absence.

And also oddly, those coincidences when you pick episodes at random. I’ve had Jackson Gibbs and Alejandro and Paloma make a couple of appearances each. And sometimes it’s as if episodes demand to be watched. Even when I’ve been aiming at some other episode, up pops one I’ve seen too many times and insists on being watched again.

Abby

But there will be less time for this later in the week. At least I hope so.

I wonder what’s in store for us in season fifteen?

(Photo © CBS)

Almost forgetting

I’ve done that summery thing and watched old episodes of NCIS every now and then. Somehow it gets boring when all current shows come to an end every May, and there’s only so much Good Wife-watching a witch can do in one fell swoop.

I’ve been quite lucky, remembering the odd old episode that I’ve barely, if ever, watched a second or third time. This week I misremembered which episode I was after, meaning I got to watch both of them, and both were great, especially for not being worn out.

And then, as I was seeing the credits flash by, I suddenly remembered Quinn. It’s amazing how both season 14 and Jennifer Esposito had totally slipped from my memory.

I need some more oldies. And it seems as if the later episodes of most seasons are the least likely to have been watched too much. Take season 12, episode 21. It was one I was reluctant to return to for various reasons, but when I did, I discovered it was virtually perfect!

Bull’s first season

Bull has been light entertainment this year. But at least it has been entertainment. That’s more than can be said for Michael Weatherly’s last workplace on occasion. One evening recently I returned home late to an empty house, and I made myself lots of tea and sat down to unwind and feel good with the latest Bull. And I did. Bull has that effect.

I didn’t even hate J P Nunnelly these last three episodes. She was meant to be annoying. She was, wasn’t she? But it worked.

Bull

There is something relaxing about the way Michael doesn’t take himself seriously. And is Benny supposed to be Bull’s Cary Agos? They are alike both in manner and looks, setting aside that one is dark and one is fair.

I see Bull has been renewed for next season. This was something I didn’t believe in when I started watching. Well, I was barely expecting to continue to watch. It looked as if we’d have a possibly boring row of successful jury outcomes. What has happened is that, yes they are – successful, not boring – but it’s the how Bull gets his results that matters. That, and the fact that when someone goes free, they find the guilty one after a bit.

Here’s to more relaxing evenings with Jason and the gang!

(Photo © CBS)

The Weatherly glue

Watching Bull this week I had a bit of an epiphany. I’d merely hoped to be entertained, something I was in much more need of after this week’s NCIS. Home of the Brave was a dreadful episode, even if they were dealing with a worthwhile topic like the right for soldiers of non-US nationality to live in America.

They tried. But the writing was poor as was the acting. Although I did come up with a purpose for Quinn. She could be there to be got rid of. The token sacrifice that needs to be made, but which doesn’t upset too much when it happens.

So, Bull. It wasn’t marvellous. But it told me one thing, and that is that Michael Weatherly has the ability to pull a whole team together; on screen, and possibly off screen as well.

I’m pleased to see him, because over the 13 years he was with NCIS, you get used to a person, even when they are not actively admired by you.  I am discovering a long term fondness for Michael.

The loss of him as DiNozzo is not the loss of one character. It’s the loss of the glue that held NCIS together. It’s often been said that Mark Harmon is that person. If so, he’s become unstuck. But I suspect it was that pesky joker, DiNozzo/Weatherly, all this time.

He took his superglue and went off to be Bull. It’s not award winning stuff – yet – but it’s a first season, and they are trying. His old place of work ought to give that a go, because they need it. Glue. And good writing. Maybe even a little good directing and good acting.