Tag Archives: Mark Strong

The Imitation Game

I was glad to see they still offered screenings of The Imitation Game this week. I’d stopped being too busy and I’d also decided to temporarily pause my Keira Knightley boycott and actually go and see this film about Alan Turing. I was a afraid it’d be as upsetting as the television programme a while back, but it was more uplifting than depressing, despite poor Turing’s fate.

The Imitation Game

There were things about Bletchley and Enigma I hadn’t actually known before, and it was good to see the story in a different light from the last ones. Benedict Cumberbatch was spot on as Alan Turing. Most of the time. They’d done a fine job of getting the aspie aspects of his personality right, except for when they hadn’t.

You don’t have someone as literal as that, and then make them reply to a heavy bit of sarcasm as though they are neurotypical. I also suspect that Benedict is a capable dancer, and I wouldn’t expect Turing to have been. He was reluctant for a reason. And all that hugging!

The Imitation Game

Nice to have both Allen Leech and Matthew Goode in there, but making them mathematical geniuses is stretching credibility somewhat. Even KK made for a likelier mathematician.

The Imitation Game

Alex Lawther was fabulous as the young Turing; giving us a perfect background to understand where he was coming from.

Very touching, and the kind of film I would see again.

(Just don’t get me started on the train rolling stock…)

Tinker Tailor Soldier Spy

They must have struggled with Benedict Cumberbatch’s hair. It’s not meant to be straight. It was – sort of – but kept waving at the back. Can’t quite get over Gary Oldman’s transformation from Sirius Black to Smiley.

The new Tinker Tailor Soldier Spy is like good coffee or dark chocolate. Not that I use either, but I suspect it’s how it must feel if you do. Like this film. It’s pure art. It’s like being inside a good painting. Somehow.

I can’t say I understood all of it, and I can no longer recollect if I ever read this particular novel by John le Carré or not. Suspect not, but the Resident IT Consultant assured me they stayed close to the plot. But it’s not the kind of film you need to understand. You just enjoy. Immerse yourself.

It probably helps that it was directed by a Swede. I’m not sure why, but it appears to be something Swedes are good at. And Tomas Alfredson strikes me as very good indeed.

As usual the authentic 1970s were too authentic, so to speak. But it looked good. And I’m amazed to see they unearthed some blue cups this time. We’ve had the green ones in every single period film or television programme for decades.

Colin Firth

Benedict Cumberbatch

Sherlock Holmes

As the Resident IT Consultant said afterwards, he had had a different kind of Sherlock Holmes in mind.

We behaved most uncharacteristically on Sunday, by first going out for a pub lunch en famille, and continuing on to the cinema afterwards. Daughter had decided Sherlock Holmes would work as light entertainment for all generations, and I suppose it did.

It was pretty lightweight, though, even as lightweight stuff goes. It could have been half an hour shorter (but then, the half hour of ads and trailers before it could also have been much shorter). The film could have had a plot.

What it seemed to have were several actors of the well known category, except I have to admit to having no idea who Robert Downey Jr is. Have heard of Jude Law, but couldn’t have picked him out in an identity parade. Mark Strong and James Fox I do know, but I prefer the former with more hair. These days when you need an important old fogey, it always seems to be a Fox.

If you like lots of fighting, running around and jumping about, coupled with a weak script, this film would be ideal. Personally I prefer my light rubbish to be slightly more fun. And shorter.