Tag Archives: Allen Leech

The Imitation Game

I was glad to see they still offered screenings of The Imitation Game this week. I’d stopped being too busy and I’d also decided to temporarily pause my Keira Knightley boycott and actually go and see this film about Alan Turing. I was a afraid it’d be as upsetting as the television programme a while back, but it was more uplifting than depressing, despite poor Turing’s fate.

The Imitation Game

There were things about Bletchley and Enigma I hadn’t actually known before, and it was good to see the story in a different light from the last ones. Benedict Cumberbatch was spot on as Alan Turing. Most of the time. They’d done a fine job of getting the aspie aspects of his personality right, except for when they hadn’t.

You don’t have someone as literal as that, and then make them reply to a heavy bit of sarcasm as though they are neurotypical. I also suspect that Benedict is a capable dancer, and I wouldn’t expect Turing to have been. He was reluctant for a reason. And all that hugging!

The Imitation Game

Nice to have both Allen Leech and Matthew Goode in there, but making them mathematical geniuses is stretching credibility somewhat. Even KK made for a likelier mathematician.

The Imitation Game

Alex Lawther was fabulous as the young Turing; giving us a perfect background to understand where he was coming from.

Very touching, and the kind of film I would see again.

(Just don’t get me started on the train rolling stock…)

Advertisements

Spoiling at Downton

Can I take it that everyone who intends to watch, has seen Sunday’s episode of Downton Abbey now? Yesterday Facebook was teeming with people who caught spoilers before catching Downton.

Are the makers of the series really wanting to give away what happens every week, or are they hinting so coarsely in order to make us feel proud that we ‘got it’ long before ‘it’ happened? This week it was simply a toss-up between Sybil, her baby or both of them.

Downton Abbey

It’s strange it’s taken them so long to start killing off The Family. We’ve been together eight years now, and there ought to have been more deaths.

The Earl is an idiot. I see that now. I was confused for so long because the actor seems quite a nice man. But had they put someone less sympathetic in the role, I’d have cottoned on to the idiocy long before now. Good for the American heiress that she has finally found her teeth, become a good mother (if a bit late) and is going against what hubby says.

The other week I did expect Sir Anthony Strallan to drop dead in the aisle of the church (on the way in, obviously) but other than that little miscalculation it’s been easy to see where we are heading, week after week.

Not so sure about the accuracy of medical advances back then, but it is hard to know what people didn’t know. And what happened to the disfigured Canadian cousin heir? Whether genuine or not, we need to know. Maybe Matthew will turn out to have wasted Lavinia’s dad’s money after all.

Downton again

Well, they need to keep Matthew alive, don’t they? We decided he can be allowed to be injured, but has to stay alive. The question is who they are going to sacrifice? And who, if anyone, deserves a white feather. I’d have done anything to get one, if it had been me.

In my next life I will be the Dowager Maggie Smith. She’s wonderful! Awful, but wonderful. I thought perhaps that Matthew’s mother was getting a little too aggressive in sending people off to the war.

Mary has grown on me. Can’t quite make out her spiteful sister. I feel sorry for her half the time and hate her the rest. And the budding nurse was never interested in the chauffeur, after all. Oh well.

Love Mrs Hughes. There’s something about those devious women who will stop at nothing to look after their family. Let’s hope Mrs Bates comes to a sticky end, and preferably soon. O’Brien hasn’t improved, but for a moment it was almost possible to feel sorry for Tom. And Daisy has grown up.

We had far too many stops for refreshments. Next week we’ll watch afterwards and save half an hour in commercials.