Too polite to stay safe

We’ve all done it, I suspect. Not said ‘no’ despite knowing full well that not to do so puts us in a situation that is at best a bit embarrassing and at worst in real danger. Usually it’s somewhere between the two. An older relative once said to me, ‘you’re so very sensible,’ and she wasn’t being complimentary. I was generally sufficiently slow, stupid or sensible that I said ‘no’ more than most. But I still did the wrong thing on occasion.

I’ve got the most recent Hollywood scandal in mind now. But it could be almost any other situation in history, because people never change.

I’m so ancient that I must have heard the accusation ‘she slept her way to the top’ for at least fifty years. I used to treat this with a pinch of salt, feeling that many successful women might just have got to the top by dint of talent and [other] hard work. Now, though, it’s become quite clear that while there might have been ‘sleeping’ involved, it wasn’t the poor, powerful man who was being lured into letting a cunning female use sex to get where she wanted to go.

She was most likely forced to. Too scared to say no, too cornered to say no, or too polite to.

I’d not thought about the being too polite [until it’s too late] to step away, until the other day when I read this: ‘You know it’s a bad idea. — You know he’s going to do you harm. He knows you know. But what do you do? You don’t wish to offend him, so you step closer. How dumb are you?’ This was about a teenage boy not keeping a good distance between himself and a dangerous criminal in the latest Skulduggery Pleasant by Derek Landy. But the sentiment is there; you are young, or pretty or female or any other thing that makes people try to get at you. Because they know you’ll be too polite to realise where it is heading before it’s too late.

Another book I read, years ago, was about a boy with Asperger Syndrome, who was bullied at school. Between them, his mother and his teacher devised a way to deal with the bully, helping the aspie boy to learn a short script, ending with a humorous surprise. It worked. Humour, and cooperation, are two great weapons. Ridicule your bully/sexual predator/film producer/boss.

If someone is doing it to you, then very likely they are, or have been, doing it to [many] others as well. Find them. Work together. It seems that employers, police and even your parents won’t necessarily believe you. Think about the film, 9 to 5. Try to find your inner Tomlin/Fonda/Parton.

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Back in Pasadena

When the toupée licked Sheldon…

Well, what kind of crazy line is that? How is Sheldon going downhill so fast? Although, I have to say I like it, and an almost normal and trying very hard Sheldon is actually a lot weirder than the earlier weird Sheldon. If you get my drift.

I don’t know if Daughter came across Sheldon and the others, since it was Pasadena she was in this week, and not LA like I said the other day. In fact, if they are not above attending [local] conferences, then I suspect at least Raj would have been where she was. (And did you know NASA forbids complimentary coffees?)

It’s good to be back, as Daughter said about Pasadena. She’d forgotten how much she likes it. And I like my new season of The Big Bang Theory. It’s touching how hard Sheldon tries. Who’d have thought he’d pop the question? Or put his bare foot down in warm apple juice. Or worse.

Amy and Sheldon

I know people complain about how unappealing BBT is. Well, they don’t have to watch. I know people say the characters are growing too old. They are, but people do. Even mad scientists grow older, and not necessarily wiser.

And now we have a whole season to plan that wedding, on a clifftop in the setting sun. Maybe. Another baby. Any television show that will go to visit Richard Feynman’s grave in the middle of the night, is good enough for me. And Penny didn’t even know he’d died.

NCIS: Los Angeles – Se Murió el Payaso

When in LA, Daughter obviously watches NCIS: Los Angeles. Good thing her drinks party ended in time to switch on the television. I’m not jealous. Any more scenes shot at such high altitude as Sam’s temporary highrise home and I will have to sit down. Sit down some more, I mean. And hold on.

NCIS: Los Angeles

But it’s interesting. Last week we began season nine with episode one. This week we appear to have carried on with episode three. Even as I watched, it felt like we had missed a little something. Maybe we have, or maybe it’s naturally disjointed.

I liked Assistant Director Mosley last week. She and her sidekick brought suitably fresh blood, although there might be less of that if there is to be minimal shooting. That’s a good thing, although I don’t wish to speculate on how realistic.

So, I had expected to see how they did this week, and they weren’t there. Not even getting a mention. Fishy?

Sam’s back and strangely childfree, and so far I have identified two possible romantic interests for him. Callen has Anna for a while longer and he also has an X-box he didn’t know he owned.

And Hetty is a bit gone, but not completely, so the question is if she’s merely being mysterious, or if this is a gradual way out for Linda Hunt. She’s even older than Mark Harmon to be doing this kind of work. If she is leaving, then the new Assistant Director might work out just fine. Unless she’s a red herring like the one many seasons ago. The one who died?

But let’s wait and see.

So far so good.

The second coming of Bull

That was a really wise start to the second season of Bull. We’d grown a little complacent, hadn’t we?

Instead of more smooth Bull moves, we are met with a discordant workplace, no money, and a Bull who seemingly teams up with the wrong side of a potential court case. And Chunk wants to leave.

Well, we can’t have any of that, and luckily Bull can still use his psychology to see who’s lying and who isn’t. Except when it comes to his lady friends, but that’s true of many men.

And then it turns out his clients don’t need to be told about his wonderful mirroring jury system, either. But this is Bull, and all will be well.

Danny, Marissa and Cable

NCIS – ‘House Divided’

My prayers have been answered. And it wasn’t a bad episode as season starters go. But don’t you find that beards grow in a funny way? Neatly and not as overall rampantly as you’d expect after a certain amount of time. I’m guessing Sean Murray and Mark Harmon didn’t get long enough to cultivate their wildest looks.

McGee

So, no Quinn. Thank goodness. And with the more senior agents engaged elsewhere, the team lead went to someone relatively new, with the help of two even newer agents and Dr Palmer behaving more grown-up than ever. And as for politics – and hot dogs – on the Hill, well it’s a weird world we live in.

Torres

The doings in Paraguay were fairly standard, as these things go; season starter with one or more agents in an awkward situation far away. But they’ve been trained, and know what to do. Same thing ‘at home.’ When the ‘parents’ are away, the ‘children’ can often cope far better than you’d think. Delilah helped, although it seems that where I believed Bishop was speaking in code, she was merely being indiscreet…

Clayton, Torres and Bishop

Floor time. I like it!

Unless we are all too traumatised to carry on, I reckon we can now go back to the way we were. And I expect at least Gibbs will lose the beard. I hope McGee does, because he’s really not the beard type. Besides, he needs to learn how to change nappies.

Torres

Torres did well. No one ate the raisins off the floor, but there was just desserts for someone, at a time when I don’t even hope for them. Here’s to next week. It’s a date.

Gibbs

(Photos © CBS)

Still good for relaxing

Old NCIS is like family. I’ve noticed how clichéd the term family has become, because it matters more than anything else. It might be that the team comes before, well, I hope not before family, but then most of our NCIS team are not family people. I am, but I can let NCIS in as well. Unlike that crap film I started to watch the other evening, a few old episodes really do relax and entertain me.

I have moved between the seasons for a while, and didn’t quite know where to go next, so I actually started on fourteen again. The first episode is better when you know the rest of the year; you know what became of the new people and who they were. Torres was darker to begin with. I feel maybe they should have him stop clowning about so much, unless he’s to be the next DiNozzo.

Oddly enough, the more I see of Kate, the less I like her. DiNozzo improved with her absence.

And also oddly, those coincidences when you pick episodes at random. I’ve had Jackson Gibbs and Alejandro and Paloma make a couple of appearances each. And sometimes it’s as if episodes demand to be watched. Even when I’ve been aiming at some other episode, up pops one I’ve seen too many times and insists on being watched again.

Abby

But there will be less time for this later in the week. At least I hope so.

I wonder what’s in store for us in season fifteen?

(Photo © CBS)

Nine years and counting

Or fourteen, if you prefer.

As we are about to embark of season fifteen of NCIS, I trust Gibbs is still all right somewhere in South America, whether he’s been in trouble for a few hours or the four months since we left him and McGee.

NCIS - Gibbs and McGee

Not that I have been counting the weeks, nor am I having a countdown to the season start, which I believe is on September 26th.

But for today Mark Harmon is 66, which is a rather witchy number, and CultureWitch is nine. Let’s hope we can both manage another year. To be perfectly honest, it’s not only NCIS that needs to get a grip. So do I. I mean, Culture does.

Happy Birthdays to us!