Monthly Archives: April 2015

NCIS – Troll

Palmer

It was about time we had a ‘to be continued,’ although I didn’t see it until we were actually there. At first it looked like they would go with the obvious ending for this type of scenario, but I came to the conclusion they’d done it too many times. I’m guessing they did too.

McGee and DiNozzo

The Bishop marital issues were perhaps a little tiresome, but necessary for the plot. Rather sweet that ‘Mr Bishop’ is getting on quite so well with Gibbs. The others just haven’t tried; I’m sure he’s dead easy to get on with.

Dorneget

Great to have Dorneget back, even with his unlikely change of career path within NCIS. Nice to have the scene of the first death back, too. You sort of feel at home when they re-use sets. And when I am thin and younger and more beautiful I’ll have a dress like Abby’s, with that very necklace.

Abby

We’re nearing the end of season 12. Has anyone not signed a contract for season 13?

Gibbs

(Photos © CBS)

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NCIS: Los Angeles – Rage

Granger and Agent Rand

Well, well, well. Two recurring NCIS actors on NCIS: Los Angeles. It’s almost too much, but still very nice, especially as the usual pattern of being the opposite of what you are on the other show, didn’t seem to happen. So we had Alicia Coppola as an FBI agent and young Gibbs, aka Sean Harmon,* as a convict.

Callen and Charlie

And we got to return to Callen as a con, six months after he was pulled from his undercover role in prison. You’d have thought his tan would have been a giveaway he hadn’t spent all that time in a solitary cell, but still. It was fine.

It’s a wonder what they can do to make an actor younger for a role, but I have to say that the younger Hetty was so scary as to make me worried. But it was another step on the journey to finding out about Callen’s past. Wonder how long they will be stringing it out?

Callen and Hetty

I welcome the break in finding fault with Deeks, which seemed like such a stupid plot device. As unlikely as him and Kensi thinking no one notices what they are up to.

All in all, pretty good, despite the high body count. Just wondered who else was on that bus with all the convicts. Surely someone would have noticed what happened?

(Photos © CBS)

*One day I look forward to seeing Sean Harmon with nice hair.

X + Y

This was a film that looked a lot more fun in the trailer than it actually was capable of delivering. That’s nothing new or unusual, but disappointing, nevertheless. We need good films about Asperger Syndrome, and a comedy about a maths prodigy seemed like a good place to start.

And yes, it was funny, and it was sort of good from an aspie point of view. But only so far. The scriptwriters knew what to put in, and then they went and did what so many films and shows do; in order for it to satisfy our neurotypical demands, the poor aspie occasionally becomes almost ‘cured’ of their affliction. If the plot needs them to. Then they can go on and be weird again.

I loved Sally Hawkins in Paddington. Here she was a loving and sometimes perfect mother to an aspie child, while at times she was so clueless you couldn’t believe it. The woman who knows her son needs seven prawn balls, or else, would have learned a few other things as well over the 14 years that she’s been her son’s mother.

According to my own maths specialist, the maths chosen to do tricks with was pretty good. Short enough to fit in, but mostly correct. Thank you for that, a least.

X + Y

Teaching yourself to speak Chinese in a few weeks, with the help of a book, even for a child prodigy… Well, it’s possible. Maybe.

Alex Lawther [who played the young Alan Turing] was another maths genius, but this time as a neurotypical one, which suited him better, but made for more upsetting viewing.

Nathan’s poor room mate in China was the real victim of the story. An almost maths genius who didn’t make the grade, and who actually doesn’t like maths very much. That’s sad.

Whereas Nathan found love and friendship and [almost] gave up on his maths. Which is possible, but less likely.