Call of Silence

It was very perceptive of Daughter to offer up Call of Silence when we were going to dine with NCIS the other day. I love it, and she doesn’t. Though she doesn’t love it for the best of reasons; she hates seeing how old and lonely and confused the veteran marine grows in his old age, and she can see that there must be many more like him out there.

Looking back on this episode I can see what a clever move it was to write it. Rather than just dealing with current or fairly recent marine/navy activity, they go back to World War II, and honour the men who fought then and look at what has become of them today.

I have never been a fan of Charles Durning in the past, and he has turned up regularly in almost everything over the years. But in Call of Silence he’s absolutely marvellous, playing the lonely Medal of Honor hero from Iwo Jima. We love the way DiNozzo discreetly waves the medal in front of the marines come to arrest the old man, making them snap to attention and salute.

In fact, this is an episode where I actively like DiNozzo. How odd.

And I love the sneaky old Japanese soldier, with the inscrutable face.

Also Kate dancing with Corporal Yost, tears running down her cheek. I always cry over this one, but usually last until Commander Coleman cries.

There’s a lot to like about this one.

Call of Silence

(Photo © CBS)

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One response to “Call of Silence

  1. Robert Nicholas

    I love this episode. (by the way it is downloadable from iTunes for $1.99). It is Emmy award winning quality. I loved the Durning’s dance with Kate to the music by Cole Porter, “Begin the Beguine.

    It was because of this strong performance by Durning that I found out what happened to a fellow Naval aviator in Vietnam in 1968. I was so touched by Durning and the NCIS crew that I emailed the Coral Sea “Wall” webmaster who happened to know the fate of LtJG Dunn.

    Several years ago, Durning was a guest speaker on TV at the Washington monument on Memorial Day and revealed that he was in the Normandy invasion of D-Day. I think that his experience from that invasion allowed him to provide that extra desire to give the performance of a lifetime in “Call of Silence.”

    Good comments made by you. Thanks.

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